maybe one of you creative types can help me
by jddomer (2013-01-08 18:04:52)
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I advise international grad students. We just had a student's thesis bound, and it needs to be signed by her supervising faculty member. He just looked at the bound copy (mind you, he's had a copy of this since the beginning of November) and notices his name is spelled wrong. Obviously wrong. On the signature page he needs to sign. This thing is already bound and ready to go, she has waited weeks for him to sign it, now he wants to "read it again and wait until Friday" to sign it.

Short of forging his signature or pushing him out a window, is there any sort of magic eraser/method for fixing the spelling without having to have the entire thing reprinted (at a cost of almost $600)?


my new admin totally hooked me up
by jddomer  (2013-01-09 10:17:54)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

Matched the font exactly on a sticker, and you can barely tell it is there. She rocks!

Thanks for all the advice... I learned my lesson, anything going to be bound needs at least 3 sets of eyes on it, every time.


You should hire this guy.
by akaRonMexico  (2013-01-09 12:06:22)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post


I'd consult your friendly printer
by Section12  (2013-01-09 09:44:02)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

and reference Kybyrnes advice below. Believe me they've been thru this before and they'll know and should advise to keep costs minimal. Tipping in is your likely answer and the bookbinder should be skilled at it.


If you have to reprint.
by tnirishfan  (2013-01-08 21:42:26)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

I think the Back Room should pitch in and get one printed to say Douche instead of Derrick. Give that one to him and see if he notices.


Depending on where these copies are going...
by Kbyrnes  (2013-01-08 19:46:38)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

...you might be able to get away with over-layering his correctly printed name. It would be very obvious to anyone looking at the page that a correction had been made, but if these copies are just being filed away it probably doesn't matter. (This is a "chine-collé" method--which another poster in this thread refers to.)

I assume the binding is some sort of library-grade hard binding (based on my familiarity with the binding of dissertations at ND, U of Chgo, and LSTC, the Lutheran Seminary in Chicago where I'm the dissertation editor). In that case, you might try excision and tipping-in. First, with a very sharp exacto knife the offending page is sliced out (and very carefully, so the next page isn't sliced too--maybe back up the page to be removed by something thick but flexible, like a sheet of plastic). Then the newly printed page is "tipped in" using a very thin bead of bookbinder's glue (I suppose Elmer's would work). The glue is applied carefully to the gutter, in a very thin line (some of my co-workers did tiny dots of glue every 16th or 8th of an inch), then the page is placed just so--when it's in, shut the book and put some weight on it for a few minutes.

We used to do the tip-in part when I was working at Kroch's & Brentano's in Chgo during grad school--we tipped in pages with author's signatures when the author couldn't show up at the store in advance to sign them--instead, they would sign a bunch of pages and send them to us. You would never know they hadn't signed the actual book. The tip-in procedure takes about 2 minutes per page once you're used to it. It might take a couple of minutes to carefully excise the old page, too, so figure an hour to take care of 12 copies.

If it's velobound, there is a tool you can get to cut the old spline.

The medieval method was to use a sharp blade to scrape the paper (their version of an eraser). But you'd then have to figure out how to get the new printed name on there.

The last possibility: when he got his copy in November, was there a document that said he was supposed to advise of any changes by such-and-such a date? If so, I'd say, we're doing the new-piece-of-printed-paper-glued-over-the-mistake method, or he can pay to have them rebound. This is an endemic problem in the publishing world, in general. After no matter how many chances to revise, and how much notice of the due date for submission of the final copy, authors are always finding something they want to change.


You know stuff about stuff. *
by ndtim2005  (2013-01-09 17:42:11)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post


Two options that I can think of ...
by subjkb  (2013-01-08 19:43:58)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

1. Have a copy of the final page reprinted, but with the correction, and you can, in a way, Chincole (sounds like Shinkolay), or otherwise adhere, the revised last page to the already bound page (just the inside edge would be noticeable, at least I think). A reputable print shop could do this quickly and for cheap -- also check with your College of Art and Design - the Printmaking professor or printmaking grad student would likely do this -- and the grad student would be happy with $20 and some beer.

2. A nice partial page sticker with the correction and related print overtop -- maybe incorporate a simple design to hide the pure corrective purpose. Not ideal, but would work inexpensively in a pinch.

Good luck. (edited for some clarity)


How many copies? What's the nature of the mistake?
by Mickey  (2013-01-08 18:56:48)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

Back in ancient times they had letters that were like rub-ons for paper. You would overlay the sheet that had all types of letter and then you would rub a pencil on the plastic sheet and the letter would adhere to the page.


12 copies
by jddomer  (2013-01-08 19:05:15)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

I spelled his name Derek instead of Derrick.


From your description off him...
by Mickey  (2013-01-08 22:34:00)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

I'm surprised you didn't shorten his name by removing the "err".


Maybe you can ask him to legally change his name.
by cj  (2013-01-08 21:38:13)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post


Why not just cross it out and hand write in the correction
by Dutch  (2013-01-08 18:35:11)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

It doesn't look pretty, but why wouldn't that work?


it's bound like a book
by jddomer  (2013-01-08 18:41:37)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

Sure, it would work, but doesn't look very professional.


can you print a label out with his name on it
by jt  (2013-01-08 20:32:10)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

and put the label over the incorrect name?

Depending on the color of the cover page, you may even be able to find a label that matches.


How is it bound?
by ndtnguy  (2013-01-08 18:24:51)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

Depending on the binding method, it might be possible to get the particular page reprinted, disassemble the binding, and put it back together by hand.

For instance, if it's perfect bound, you might be able to cut the page out and just glue a new page in. Maybe. If it's saddle stapled, something similar should be possible if you 1) can get a page printed on the right size paper and 2) can lay hands on a pair of needle nose pliers and big enough staples. If it's stitched, you're probably SOL on that angle.

Of course, there's always correction tape and a rubber stamp. Go to Office Depot and get an old-fashioned rubber stamp with moveable letters, white out his name, and then stamp the correct name in the same spot.


not sure of the method, but I looked at it and
by jddomer  (2013-01-08 18:42:49)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

it doesn't look like anything I could easily take apart. I might see if the correction tape thing would work, then print his name on a clear label and add it like that.


If it's bound locally, the student should be able to
by mkovac  (2013-01-08 19:32:58)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

take it back and have it re-done at a minimal cost - if it's bound with those post-thingies.


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