Aaron Hernandez commits suicide in prison *
by needamirer (2017-04-19 07:12:42)




Apparent suicide
by ShermanOaksND  (2017-04-19 10:58:18)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

His agent (former agent? do former players-turned inmates still keep their agents?) insists Hernandez never would've killed himself, and the timing seems odd for a suicide. It wouldn't exactly be the most difficult thing in the world to make a strangulation murder look like suicide by hanging. Every apparent suicide is a potential murder, especially in prison.


And now there are claims that Hernandez was bisexual
by ShermanOaksND  (2017-04-21 18:29:03)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

and that this could've been a motive for his alleged suicide suicide, or his murder of Odin Lloyd (who allegedly knew Hernandez's secret). (Link to Newsweek.)


Well then
by Wooderson  (2017-04-22 15:28:34)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

I'd call it nothing to worry about, but "follow the money" is usually a good way to unravel a story.


Prisoners are able to barricade doors in prisons?
by GolfJunkie17  (2017-04-19 23:57:09)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

I was under the idea that the cell doors open outwards to avoid that exact situation. Though, I'm sure that is not a universal truth. I also think I read that his cell was under constant closed circuit video surveillance. I'm not saying he didn't commit suicide, but there's some questionable circumstances if he did, and the guards on duty should probably have to answer some hard questions.

And, to be clear, I find it a shame that he did take the easy way out by committing suicide. He deserved to suffer more punishment for the crime he was found guilty of. Not to mention other crimes he may also have committed.


Shivs also make good door jambs. *
by RocketShark  (2017-04-21 13:57:52)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post


I thought that
by HTownND  (2017-04-19 14:51:09)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

But apparently, they have video of it, and he attempted to barricade himself in. It's hard to barricade the door from the outside.


I could see
by WilfordBrimley  (2017-04-21 01:32:28)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

where someone like Bradley - who gets out in two years - threatened Hernandez's family after the verdict came down, and that was that. A complete shit-against-the-wall guess, but plausible.


The timing is weird, unless . . .
by IrishJosh24  (2017-04-19 12:18:44)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

(1) He wanted to be found guilty. I have a hard time imagining why, exactly, but I suppose another guilty verdict may have somehow boosted credibility in the gang he was supposedly associated with. (I also found it very odd when he got that neck tattoo. It's sort of like he expected and wanted to spend his life in prison and flaunted his guilt.)

(2) He felt guilty for getting away with those two murders (and/or perhaps other things he did).

(3) He realized that, despite this victory in court, he was unlikely to leave prison alive and couldn't bear to be away from his fiancee and daughter (or others).

I don't know. I was shocked when my wife told me he had been found dead. Maybe he was killed.


That's the thing about suicide
by LondonDomer  (2017-04-19 18:42:43)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

Suicidal folks don't often consider timing.


A theory from /r/Patriots
by irishboy89  (2017-04-19 12:31:56)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

The motive behind Hernandez's killing of Odin Lloyd was that he was concerned about Lloyd talking around about the original double homicide. Once Hernandez was acquitted of the double homicide, he was left serving life for a crime that was, in retrospect, unnecessary.

It doesn't seem too hard to believe that being acquitted of these murders was harder on him than if he had been found guilty.


That was the prosecution's theory
by tf86  (2017-04-19 17:38:01)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

Apparently, the second jury wasn't necessarily buying it.


That's a more plausible suicide motive to me
by ShermanOaksND  (2017-04-19 15:50:37)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

Also, the Patriots were visiting the White House today. Maybe that made him more depressed. Apparently he never fully recovered from his father's death years ago.


I can see the logic in that. *
by SWPaDem  (2017-04-19 13:13:06)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post


The cruelest irony is that because of Hernandez's death
by ShermanOaksND  (2017-04-19 12:03:41)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

his murder conviction, which had been on appeal, is automatically vacated under Massachusetts law. Technically, he no longer has a criminal record. It's as if he'd never been charged. The wrongful death lawsuit arising from that murder will have to proceed without Hernandez and without use of that now-non-existent conviction.


His firearms conviction may stand.
by Mr Wednesday  (2017-04-19 18:43:43)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

So it's not true that he no longer has a criminal record. He's merely no longer a murderer.


not exactly, if he hasn't exhausted his appeals
by irishkey9  (2017-04-20 12:56:53)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

the conviction will be vacated post death.


Saw speculation that filing of an appeal matters.
by Mr Wednesday  (2017-04-21 19:21:06)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

I don't know if it's true, as I'm not a lawyer nor particularly knowledgeable about MA law.


That would be correct under Massachusetts law *
by ShermanOaksND  (2017-04-21 18:26:39)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post


I'm not sure of Massachusetts law, but I thought
by tf86  (2017-04-19 17:40:43)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

That once he had been sentenced, then it became a conviction. Maybe the fact that the appeal was pending meant that the conviction wasn't yet final.

Ken Lay, who died after he was found guilty but before he was sentenced, is perhaps a textbook example of a conviction being vacated due to death.


The legal rule in Massachusetts is called abatement
by irishkey9  (2017-04-20 12:03:45)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

A court will vacate the conviction because an appeal is pending. The state chooses to say that the conviction is abated, as if it never happened. This has a significant impact on civil cases which rely on criminal decisions as its basis for facts.


Ken Lay isn't dead.
by dbldomer  (2017-04-19 22:05:17)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

I have quite a few friends in Houston who believe that. Died in Aspen, autopsy and cremation all occurred within 24 hours. Because he died before sentencing, his conviction was vacated and his wife got to keep all the money that would have been forfeited during sentencing.

I'm not saying he's alive.


Supposedly only one person saw Lay's body after he died.
by omaharic  (2017-04-20 11:36:06)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

That person was the one who cremated him. How convenient.


I just asked this in the BR but didn't that create an
by G.K.Chesterton  (2017-04-19 12:37:49)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

incentive for Hernandez to commit suicide?

I have never heard before of a state vacating a murder conviction because of a suicide (but then I am not a lawyer).


That doesn't seem like a plausible suicide motive to me *
by ShermanOaksND  (2017-04-19 15:49:00)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post