today's mostly worthless trivia
by kdh325 (2017-06-26 15:54:17)
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From 1900 forward, he gave up the most passed balls in a single season. To his defense, his staff did include two knuckleballers who combined for over 300 innings. Interestingly, if we included the 19th century players, he would've ranked 220th or so.


I don't know the person but will guess the team.
by G.K.Chesterton  (2017-06-26 15:58:10)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

The White Sox.


spot on
by kdh325  (2017-06-26 16:07:25)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post



I think you should double-check your answer
by Father Nieuwland  (2017-06-26 20:24:00)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

Baseball reference lists a player from the 1980s who tried (often unsuccessfully) to catch Charlie Hough's knuckleball.


Dammit, I used BB Reference... I guess I saw the xx87
by kdh325  (2017-06-28 18:42:12)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

in with all the 18xx's and saw it as 1887. I'm just gonna start personal messaging you first, just to make sure I don't screw it up. Grrr.


Seems to me that they used a lot of catchers in that era
by Kayo  (2017-06-26 19:59:07)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

The Sox had a really good pitching staff. In addition to Wilhelm and Fisher, they had Tommy John when he could throw hard, Gary Peters, Joel Horlen, Juan Pizarro, and several other established pitchers who were at the ends of their careers.

Unfortunately those mid-60s teams didn't hit very well; and if I am remembering correctly, they used several catchers - Sherm Lollar (not sure when he retired), John Romano, JC Martin (of '69 Mets shoe polish fame), Cam Carreon, and a cast of lesser names as if the names on my list aren't lesser enough.

I'd guess Romano; and if not Romano, Martin. I know it wasn't Smokey Burgess. He didn't log much time behind the plate at that point in his career.

I can't remember what I had for lunch yesterday, but take me back to ages 10 - 12 and I'll give you both Chicago teams' lineups and several others too.


When he said two knuckleballers, my mind drifted to
by G.K.Chesterton  (2017-06-27 12:30:02)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

Hoyt Wilhelm and Wilbur Wood, which led to my answer, but admittedly, I actually don't know if they ever played the same year, so it might have been dumb luck.


I'm certain Wood was later. *
by Kayo  (2017-06-27 17:31:10)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post


I would also guess
by 1978Irish  (2017-06-27 10:32:31)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

JC Martin. I thought he was the Sox catcher for the longest time in the 1960's when Wilhelm and Fisher were with the Sox.


Being a Sox fan at ages 10-12 from 1968-70 was not a...
by Scoop80  (2017-06-26 23:04:13)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

pleasant experience given all of the Cub fans I encountered daily. I could name the Cubs' lineup from that era, too, although Durocher made it fairly easy.

I saw a guy wearing a Cubs' Milt Pappas replica jersey at Saturday's game against the Fish. He told me that his name is Pappas, too. We spoke about Pappas's 26 and 2/3 of a perfecto against the Padres.


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