Boley et al article on this gen. Women athletes attitudes
by NOBBYDOMER (2017-06-25 14:19:36)
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If this link doesn't work, it wasn't from not trying (take it easy Baba!)

Anyway, Sally Jenkins Wa. Post has great article on young women's athletes psychology.
Good statistics on attitudes re accepting coaching, inflated self opinion of talent, etc.
To me this is the real story between large numbers of transfers.


She'll never miss a beat to compliment Pat
by okerland  (2017-06-26 23:31:52)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

I wonder if this was spurred by the rash of transfers from UT


AAU effect
by tedstheman  (2017-06-26 10:50:22)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

I believe the growth of AAU programs has contributed as well. Almost all highly regarded recruits play AAU ball and have "coaches" who cater to them. When the kid gets to College and the new coach tells them different they often can't or don't want to accept it.


Good point and both their h.s. and college coaches would
by Indy77  (2017-06-26 15:52:30)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

admit that after a summer of AAU ball, their skills diminish drastically.
Most noticeable is the poor defensive fundamentals and shooting mechanics.


Some context would be nice inside the article
by cbiebel  (2017-06-26 02:58:12)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

Nearly 60 percent of high school students say they expect to get a graduate degree — when just 9 to 10 percent actually will.And 47 percent of Division I women’s basketball players think it’s at least “somewhat likely” they will play professional or Olympic ball, but the reality? The WNBA drafts just 36 players, 0.9 percent.

How does this compare to the past? Kids coming out of HS have usually had higher expectations until the college experience hits them in the face.

Ten to twenty years ago how many Div 1A Football players coming out of HS thought they had a chance at playing in the NFL? How about Men's Basketball and the NBA?

Edit: Also, how much of this is the fault of the kids and how much is the fault of "helicopter parents?"


Truly, this is the best working link I've ever seen!
by BabaGhanouj  (2017-06-25 17:40:20)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

No thanks to me, but thanks to NDoggie (if I remember correctly), you've taken up fishing and probably provide fish for your whole village. I wouldn't be surprised if you have become a fishing instructor to boot! (Easy does it.)

Now as far as the content of the link, I also agree with you and 2Domer, and, like 2Domer, I relate so well to the article (as my mother says, "Oh, just buck up! Don't be such a wimp.") that I know it can't be the complete explanation. Life is tough, no matter how tough you try to be. We all need a little luck.

I hope all transfers from Notre Dame get lucky.


Near as I can tell, EB is a really great person...
by 2Domer  (2017-06-25 14:45:43)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

I think most of us really can't relate to the pressures inherent in being a gifted and highly touted athlete in a big time program. You want so much to excel, to be the player and person your friends, family and fans want and expect you to be, and to not disappoint. I think it can be a situation in which you simply want to escape from it all, and to put yourself in a position in which it is okay not to be perfect. I think you can become a prisoner of your own expectations, even if others aren't intentionally applying that kind of pressure. Personally I am extremely sympathetic to someone who feels like he or she simply wants or needs to make a change, especially if the person appears to be a genuinely good person. It doesn't need to make sense to me according to external measures. How a person feels is kind of important. The best thing that ever happened to me was when I got a "C" in the first semester of my freshman year. It didn't seem like it at the time, but from that moment on it was okay just to be a normal person.


I thought that the most succinct part of the article
by Tim Kelley  (2017-06-25 15:50:05)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

was this. "Players can let that demoralize them — or shape them into someone stronger. The choice is ultimately theirs, not the coach’s."

Not all good athletes who are good people are going to choose the later.


I didn't intend to paint with a broad brush either...
by 2Domer  (2017-06-25 16:38:20)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

I'm all for being tough and overcoming, etc. I don't disagree with that. I just worry about what I don't know (and I don't know squat).


AS usual, 2D's wisdom greatly exceeds his age. *
by 65DOMER  (2017-06-25 15:23:41)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post


Or at least maturity level. *
by 2Domer  (2017-06-25 16:39:53)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post


This link may work, if the above link didn't. (link)
by sixtythreer  (2017-06-25 22:38:53)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post


Quite the quipster! *
by BabaGhanouj  (2017-06-26 08:48:05)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post


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