Are ND students trying to graduate a semester early?
by 206er (2017-07-17 11:43:31)
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This is more and more common at my school, especially among international students. Saves a cool $33,000, plus whatever you can earn on the job that spring semester.


I also went part time 2d semester, 6 hrs and internship
by irishcane  (2017-07-18 10:02:38)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

The internship was with the newly elected prosecutor and they didn't know what they were doing and had little time to give me something to do.

The classes were Tuesday/Thursday back to back at 2:00pm and 3:30. So I went to school from 2-4:45, Tuesday and Thursday. It got bad when the cashiers at Belmont were worried about me.

I could have had a second major if I had taken a pre-1600 history course but it started at 11:00am and that was too early.


I went part-time for the 2nd semester senior year
by dakotadomer  (2017-07-18 08:27:16)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

No idea if it saved some money -- I just knew I was getting credits that weren't part of my curriculum and I didn't want to miss that last semester.


I graduated a year early in 2005
by Lambconnection  (2017-07-17 16:44:44)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

Would have been class of 2006. I had the AP credits going in to do it. I was an Accounting major so I stayed the fourth year and got my Master's in Accounting which made me eligible to sit for the CPA exam in my state. This also allowed me to save about a semester worth of tuition (on top of the year shaved off) as I received a merit based scholarship to the Master's Program that I would not have been eligible for as an undergrad because undergrad scholarships at the time required a demonstrated need.


CornerDrinker96 did this our senior year.
by akaRonMexico  (2017-07-17 16:06:14)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

He was a computer science engineer. He then proceeded to come back to campus, live on my couch and torture the freshman that lived down the hall. So basically he got to spend a semester living like an Arts & Legos major.


My son could have done it
by IndyDave  (2017-07-17 15:42:11)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

My son graduated from ND in May. Applied and Computational Mathematics and Statistics major.

He could have arranged classes to be done after Fall Semester and given the number of AP classes ND accepted he might have been able to be done after three years.

That being said, he graduated at 21 (and still is 21). I was fine with him staying for his senior year - he loved dorm life, loved The Observer. It was by far the best of his four years at Notre Dame (well other than 4-8). I wasn't ready to throw him in to the real world at 20. It is different for each kid and I can easily see a world in which I would have pushed him to wrap up early.

That said, he's an only child, the college funds from myself and my ex were well positioned. He knows that grad school is on him - and he's hoping to sock away the cash from his job as he decides over the next few years what he wants to do.

None of his friends wrapped up early in way - though most of them were engineers,


Sounds like he used the spring to
by 206er  (2017-07-17 15:56:17)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

wash off the taste of 4-8.


I wouldn't have traded that semester for anything
by elcortez01  (2017-07-17 13:30:17)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

I mean I wouldn't trade that time with friends for anything. Now, if I could have had school wrapped up and saved tuition $, well that's another story. That said if I had that going for me, I very well may not have lived to see May of 2001.


Some schools allowing fewer AP credits to make this harder. *
by G.K.Chesterton  (2017-07-17 13:14:20)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post


ND is heading down this path
by enduff  (2017-07-17 13:50:42)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

Word is that with the new curriculum they will be accepting far fewer AP credits.


Or simply slotting them into a higher-level course *
by El Kabong  (2017-07-17 13:21:05)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post


I graduated a semester early in 2004.
by The Federalist  (2017-07-17 12:51:27)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

It wasn't something I'd really planned on doing, but I realized toward the end of junior year that I would have enough credits to graduate and couldn't justify asking my parents to pay another semester of tuition for me to just hang around and have fun. The mistake that I made was finding a real job that spring and having to move away. I should have tried to find an hourly wage job in town for the semester to cover living expenses and had fun. If my son is ever in that situation, I'll encourage him to stick around for all of senior year.


Makes sense
by vivaflanner  (2017-07-17 12:14:23)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

The trend shows the increasing separation between the value of the actual education and the cost. Or more subtly, the value of the education and the value of having the degree/credential.

The credential is more valuable then ever, as a entry passport to better employment. The value of what you actually learn hasnt increased as quickly. And of course, the cost has grown above inflation beyond any justification.


I suspect that there is an uptick in people thinking
by fontoknow  (2017-07-17 12:06:11)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

about doing this when they start school (very difficult to identify).

In reality, I'm not sure there has been any really increased trend in the execution of this. There are a number of structure impediments to this:

(1) Senior capstone courses only available spring term for some majors
(2) Graduate and professional schools start in Aug/Sept and don't typically allow for Jan starts.
(3) Many desirable employers hire in cohorts and won't start a person till Aug/Sept anyway.


my roomie '73
by D8NDomer  (2017-07-17 15:51:51)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

graduated early to take a radio job. Came back in the fall to get masters.

GI!


Part-Time status
by 96_ND  (2017-07-17 14:31:23)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

When I was in school I knew a number of seniors who would be part time students their second semester senior year. They were limited to 9 credits but they saved a decent chunk off tuition by doing it.


2 of my 3 did that.
by domer79dad09  (2017-07-17 15:06:41)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

I appreciated saving the big chunk in tuition payments.


One of my friends graduated in December of our senior year.
by Rockbrig97  (2017-07-17 12:30:01)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

He took a job as a manager at the Hollister store at the UP Mall for the spring semester as he waited for grad school to start in the fall. We laughed our asses off when one of his employees asked him to Prom.


Was your friend Mitch Cumstein? *
by rkellyatrecess  (2017-07-17 20:25:14)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post


You left out the conclusion. *
by Irish Tool  (2017-07-17 14:02:02)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post


The Paulister!
by OrangeJubilee  (2017-07-17 12:40:46)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

I did graduate early from ND and worked as a busy season intern for a big 4 firm. For three months made more (interns get paid overtime) then I did when I started full time there in August.


That's pretty good
by fontoknow  (2017-07-17 12:34:34)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

I had a fair number of friends graduate early and then stick around for a lax spring semester of senior year. But it really was a small number.

I don't sense a meaningful uptick in this over the last few years.


I don't think 2 and 3 apply
by brewcitydomer  (2017-07-17 12:23:53)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

Why spend a semester's tuition just because you won't be an apex achiever for seven months? Find a part-time job and enjoy your fleeting freedom, and save cash in the process, especially if more school is in your immediate future.


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