NYC Backroomers - a few questions about your fine city
by LondonDomer (2013-01-08 16:28:58)
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I'm working on a piece for an article and I was wondering if you guys could help me out. Specifically, I just need to know if these sections of the city are "known" for anything (for example, you might go to this specific area for great Italian food, or for shopping, or to see a show). I'm sure I could some info just by googling, but I don't want to get any false info.

Specifically the areas I'm interesting in are:

1) TriBeCa (Triangle Below Canal)
2) NoHo

Are either of these areas 'known' for certain things?

Thanks much!



i grew up in SoHo - in between those two
by irishnyer (click here to email the poster)  (2013-01-08 19:44:51)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

Email me.


Well, my sister lives in Tribeca.
by Papa November  (2013-01-08 18:17:12)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

See what kind of traction that gets you with your readers.


Geographically NoHo is very small
by voidoid  (2013-01-08 16:39:08)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

It's basically two blocks wide, from Broadway to Bowery, and spans from Houston in the south to Astor Place in the north (although the area immediately surrounding Astor Place is usually just known as Astor Place.) Much like Soho it's a lot of old loft buildings with some new high-end buildings mixed end. It's very expensive real estate. I'm not sure you can say it's really "known" for anything in particular.

I always associate TriBeCa with families who want to live in lofts instead of the UES. It's a pretty bland expanse of converted industrial buildings - sort of a SoHo west but without the concentration of shopping. As bucket says, the Film Festival maybe.


Tribeca
by theblackwatch  (2013-01-08 18:44:49)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

In addition to the "loft family" (strollers everywhere) aspect of Tribeca, I guess it's also known for movies being filmed there and a bunch of celebrities with homes in the neighborhood (Gwyneth Paltrow, Jay-Z, etc.). A bunch of top-end restaurants that pride themselves on a "downtown" vibe, too.

Tribeca Citizen has a series of "then and now" pictures of the neighborhood that give a decent sense of what the streets look like and also how anyone who bought real estate in the neighborhood during the 1980s made an absolute killing (a few zip codes in Tribeca now up there as the priciest in the city). The streets up towards Canal (as opposed to down by the World Trade Center) look industrial and almost deserted from the outside, but the inside of most of the lofts in Tribeca are typically very impressive.


I used to be a DOJ attorney advisor to a federal court
by starburns  (2013-01-09 02:27:35)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

in Manhattan. The judges had insane real estate stories. One went in with three friends to put together $100,000 to buy an abandoned factory in Chelsea in 1982. He put in slightly more than the others, so they gave him the top floor and the roof access. It has an Empire State Building view and is on the same block as Marquee. I think the last assessment valued it for resale at like $4.8 million. Another judge went to view a property in Soho with his wife that had an industrial elevator that would have allowed them to build a garage inside the apartment. The owner wanted $5,000 for someone to take it off his hands, but the judge's wife couldn't get over how raw the space was and the fact that they'd have to at least enclose the toilet that was just sitting in one corner. Others were trying to downsize from their three and four bedroom apartments on the Park but couldn't afford to maintain a park view. It was unreal.


Well, for Manhattan, Wooderson's your man.
by bucket  (2013-01-08 16:35:30)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

But here are a few tips:

Tribeca is usually known for the Tribeca film festival. I always liked going to see The Ghostbusters Fire Station.

And NoHo? Depending on how you define the parameters (Noho, Soho, Nolita, the Bowery and the Lower East Side all sort of blend together) you can argue Katz', Russ and Daughters Appetizers etc. (I'm aware these are on the south side of Houston, but still, it's right across the street).


Ah, one more.
by bucket  (2013-01-08 16:38:23)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

According to Google Maps, McSorley's is about half a block east of NoHo. Again, depends on how strict your parameters are.


McSorleys is East Village; Katz's and Russ & Daughters
by voidoid  (2013-01-08 16:40:15)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

are Lower East Side (as they are both south of Houston.) None of these would be considered NoHo.


Yeah, I was surprised at how small the piece of land is
by bucket  (2013-01-08 16:44:59)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

To be honest, I frequently use "Lower East Side" as a blanket term to cover almost all of that area.


Which is correct, as the terminology of
by voidoid  (2013-01-08 16:48:09)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

East Village and NoHo are basically inventions of the real estate market, trying to "class up" areas of the LES.


Ah, the charming real estate monikers.
by bucket  (2013-01-08 16:53:26)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

My least favorites, I think:

Hell's Kitchen somehow became "Clinton"
Bushwick became "East Williamsburg"
The Boerum Hill, Cobble Hill, Carrol Gardens area became "BoCoCa"
And my personal favorite - my sketchy-ass neighborhood in Brooklyn was definitely Crown Heights, but they tried to meld it with Prospect Heights next door into "ProCro"


"Clinton" is the absolute worst.
by captaineclectic  (2013-01-09 09:45:46)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

I don't think I knew a single persn in Hell's Kitchen who called it "North Chelsea" or "Clinton" or even "Midtown West." It's Hell's Kitchen.


You moved just in time to miss the Hudson Yards kickoff.
by Wooderson  (2013-01-09 14:35:39)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

I mean, yes, that is it's name before the marketers got to it (I think), but hoo boy, that place is going ot be a disaster zone for the next 15 years or so.


Technically, I think that I live in Kips Bay.
by EricCartman  (2013-01-08 18:18:36)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

I refuse to say that I live in Kips Bay because no one knows where I am talking about, so I say that I live in Stytown.

If I lived in Bushwick, I would rename the place, too.


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