Best & fastest way to learn to use my new Canon Rebel T4i?
by Jurassic (2013-01-03 16:24:33)
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Online class?

Local Camera Shop class?


Kelby Training is excellent
by Irishlawyer  (2013-01-03 21:41:23)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

A one month pass gets unlimited online classes for about $30. You can also get a ton of stuff from them for free on their other podcasts.

The Kelby training on how to shoot high school football is a must for any dad who shoots his kid's sports.


Bracketing.
by Finn_MacCool  (2013-01-03 16:50:09)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

Take multiple photos of the same subject with different settings. Learn how to quickly change the f stop, shutter speed and ISO.


Lessons from Andre Agassi *
by Otter  (2013-01-03 16:38:33)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post


Might be better off with lessons from Stevie Wonder. (v) (link)
by goirishgo  (2013-01-04 15:52:52)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post


Take a bunch of pictures
by grnd  (2013-01-03 16:33:54)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

preferably with someone who knows what they are doing. But mostly just take a ton of pictures.

I usually shoot on aperture priority, which means I pick the aperture setting and let the camera pick the shutter speed. If I want no depth of field (i.e., the background subjects are blurry), I set the aperture as low as I can get it (4 if I can get it -- fast lenses make a big difference here). If I want to have lots of depth of field, I set the aperture higher: 10+ if I can get it (again, depends on the lens).

I am fairly certain that your camera will blink at you through the viewfinder if you are picking a setting that will likely result in a shakey or underexposed picture. Sometimes that's okay as you can adjust it during processing (via whatever photo program you use).

Also play around with the ISO settings. 400 is pretty standard. Use higher for lower light situations. Things on my Canon get grainy above 1600.

I rarely ever use the flash.


Learning about the balance between aperture, shutter (edit)
by anthro_domer  (2013-01-03 17:07:37)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

speed and ISO is probably the most important thing. White Balance is probably important to know about too, but probably depends on how good the automatic settings are.

I usually try to go full manual, but that's really only an option if you have the time and chance to capture multiple shots. If you're trying to catch anything quickly, it's not really the best way to go.

Edit: I've linked a decent primer on this.


Good advice. You could also get a book specific to your
by HoundDog1973  (2013-01-03 16:42:44)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

camera. There are several "how to" books specific to several models of digital SLR's that walk you through every feature you have, and give tips on how to maximize your camera's capabilities. You will find that you will only use a few of the features, which is OK as long as you understand how to use those features well. Look in any camera store for such a book.


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